Articles about Python

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Python is one of the most versatile programming languages in the world. With Python, you can control electronics, build web applications and perform machine learning.

In this page, you can find articles on Python references, coding and application setup.

How to use threading.Condition to wait for several Flask-APScheduler one-off jobs to complete execution in your Python 3 application

Previously, I discussed how to use Flask-APScheduler in your Python 3 Flask application to run multiple tasks in parallel, from a single HTTP request.

When we run jobs as discussed in that post, jobs are ran once by the underlying ApScheduler instance. In addition, our Flask endpoint return the HTTP response back to the HTTP client as soon as the jobs are scheduled.

If we do not want the HTTP client to know the outcome of the jobs within that HTTP call, then we are good. But what if we want to include any errors that the jobs encounter in the same HTTP response?

In such a situation, we will need a mechanism to wait for the one-off jobs to complete execution before returning that response.

Given that in mind, this post shows how we can use threading.Condition to wait for several Flask-APScheduler one-off jobs to complete execution.

How to create an interval task that runs periodically within your Python 3 Flask application with Flask-APScheduler

Previously, I talked about how to use Flask-APScheduler in your Python 3 Flask application to run multiple tasks in parallel, from a single HTTP request.

If you wish to run long running tasks triggered by an HTTP request, then that post will help you do so.

However, what if you want to run jobs periodically without blocking your Flask HTTP server from serving HTTP requests?

In this case, you will want to run an interval task with Flask-APScheduler.

Given that, let’s look at how we can use Flask-APScheduler to create an interval task within your Python 3 Flask application.

How to setup MicroPython WebREPL on your ESP32 development board

When I wrote about setting up MicroPython on an ESP development board, I came across the WebREPL.

If you setup MicroPython WebREPL on your ESP32 board, then you can interact with your ESP32 board wirelessly.

In case you need it, this is how to setup MicroPython WebREPL on your ESP32 development board.

How to setup MicroPython on your ESP32 development board to run Python applications

When my friend Youssef shared a link to MicroPython, I kept it at the back of my mind. Since I had found some time to sharpen my saw, I decided to take a look at it.

If I get familiar MicroPython, then I can perform machine learning magic with an AIOT board like Sipeed Maixduino Kit with greater ease.

Given that in mind, here are the steps that I took to setup MicroPython on my ESP32 development board to kickstart my learning.

In case you wish to setup MicroPython on your ESP32 development board to run Python applications, read on to find out more.

How to read RFID tags from SparkFun RFID USB Reader with Python 3

When you have an RFID starter kit from Sparkfun, you will be able to read RFID tags through serial.

Previously, we saw how to use an ESP32 board to read RFID tags from a SparkFun RFID USB Reader.

Given that, I was able to build a ESP32 prototype to scan tag ids from RFID cards.

In order for that ESP32 prototype to recognise what each of my tag card represents, I need to label the ids. Whenever my ESP32 prototype gets a tag id, it will query a tag catalogue to see what that tag id represent.

Since it is easier to label the tag cards from a computer, I built a Python 3 application to read the RFID tags from the SparkFun RFID reader.

So how we can read RFID tags from SparkFun RFID USB Reader with Python 3?

If you are looking for a way to read RFID tags from SparkFun RFID USB Reader with Python 3, then this post is for you.

How to use Python 3 to convert your images to Base64 encoding

When you encode your images in Base64, your images can be transferred and saved as text.

Although there will be a 37% bloat in space requirements, it can be useful to encode images in Base64.

For example with SAP HANA XS Advanced, you can quickly build an OData service to receive images via JSON.

Given that, let’s see how we can encode an image in Base64 encoding with Python 3.

How to read soil moisture level with Raspberry Pi and a YL-69/FC-28 moisture sensor

When I did a Raspberry Pi 4 Model B review, I got myself a Raspberry Pi 4 Model B. Therefore, the current Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ that I have been using for validating Raspberry Pi ideas became available for another IoT project in the house.

So what should I do with my Raspberry Pi?

Since I have always wanted to build my own indoor herb garden, I plan to use it to help my plants grow well.

When I bought the LED Grow Lights, I am able to give my plants consistent lighting. Given that consistent lighting is solved, I can use my Raspberry Pi 3 to monitor soil moisture so that I can provide water my plants better.

Given these points, this is a proof of concept that I did to read soil moisture level with my Raspberry Pi and a YL-69/FC-28 moisture sensor.

How to use the MCP3008-I/P chip to help your Raspberry Pi read digital data from analog sensors

Although your Raspberry Pi is unable to read analog input out of the box, you can get a MCP3008 I/P ADC chip to help your Raspberry Pi do so.

MCP3008 IP ADC chip up close

When you connect a MCP3008 I/P chip to your Raspberry Pi, you can read up to 8 analog inputs with SPI.

Given these points, this post will show you how you can use the MCP3008 I/P chip to help your Raspberry Pi read digital data from analog sensors.