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How to read temperature and humidity from a DHT11 sensor that is connected to a Raspberry Pi 3

I had always wanted to measure the temperature and humidity of the environment where my herbs are grown at.

Since I had a few pieces of Raspberry Pi 3 lying around the house, I decided to use one of them to measure the temperature and humidity of the area of the house where my herbs are.

An additional sensor is required to measure the temperature and humidity of the environment. Therefore, I went to AliExpress and got a DHT11 sensor. By connecting a DHT11 sensor to my Raspberry Pi 3, I can give it the ability to read the temperature and humidity of its environment.

Given these points, I created this post to show how to read temperature and humidity from a DHT11 sensor that is connected to a Raspberry Pi 3.

In order for us to check the temperature and humidity from the DHT11 sensor, we will build a simple Flask application that returns the temperature and humidity values as HTTP responses to HTTP clients.

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Building a Raspberry Pi 3 prototype camera that takes a picture at the press of a button

A fun way to test your Raspberry Pi Camera on your Raspberry Pi 3 is to build a prototype that takes a picture at the press of a button. Through such an activity, we will be able to experience:

  • connecting a button to the GPIO ports on a Raspberry Pi.
  • setting up a camera through the CSI interface of a Raspberry Pi.
  • preparing an operating system, such as Raspbian Stretch Lite , for running Raspberry Pi projects.
  • coding a Python 3 script that interacts with the GPIO port and camera on a Raspberry Pi.
  • running a Python 3 script when Raspberry Pi powers on.

Given these points, this post shows how you can build a Raspberry Pi 3 prototype camera that takes a picture at the press of a button.

How to enable Raspberry Pi camera on Raspbian Stretch Lite

Previously, I had written two posts on how you can connect the Raspberry Pi Camera Module to Raspberry Pi 2/3 and Raspberry Pi Zero W:

When you install Raspbian Stretch Lite on your Raspberry Pi, you will need to enable the Raspberry Pi camera before you can use it.

In case you need a reference, this post will show you how to enable Raspberry Pi camera on Raspbian Stretch Lite.

Comparing the 0.67x wide angle lens and the Fisheye lens on a Raspberry Pi CCTV

Raspberry Pi Zero W with magnetic adapter ring 0.67x wide angle lens and fisheye lens on wooden floor

Recently, I found a pack of Camera Lens Kit for mobile phones. Inside that pack, there is one 0.67x wide angle lens and one Fisheye lens.

Given that, I had created the following posts to show how you can put them onto your Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV:

In case you want to see the effect of those lens before getting a pack to turn your Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV or Raspberry Pi 3 CCTV into wide angle security cameras, read this post to compare the effects of 0.67x wide angle lens and Fisheye on a Raspberry Pi CCTV.

How to turn your Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV into a wide angle security camera

When Raspberry Pi Zero W appeared in the market, I immediately got one and setup a Raspberry Pi Zero W security camera with motionEyeOS. In addition to taking half the size of a credit card, a Raspberry Pi Zero W comes with Wi-Fi inbuilt. Therefore, it is ideal for building a security camera that connects to your Wi-Fi network.

Previously, I wrote about how to make your Raspberry Pi Zero W camera see an ultra-wide view through a Fisheye lens.

Since the pack of Camera Lens Kits for mobile phones includes a 0.67x wide angle lens, I decided to use it to turn my other Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV into a wide angle security camera.

If you need a reference, read this to find out how you can turn your Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV into a wide angle security camera.

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