Tag archive for: WordPress

Implementing Google Custom Search as a WordPress page without using any plugin

Creating a search engine to search content across a polyglot website is not an easy task. In order to do that, you need to either:

  • take a search query and match it across data repositories from different application processes, or
  • have a process that will maintain an index of content from the different applications and search within that content.

Since Google had indexed most of the content in the Internet, Google Custom Search can be the easiest way for us to implement site-wide search. In addition to fast searching, Google Custom Search also comes with AdSense monetization.

In case you need it, this is how you can implement Google Custom Search as a WordPress page without using any plugin.

How to create a custom page template in WordPress

We use pages in WordPress to hold content of our website that are not specifically time-dependent.

Examples of such content at Techcoil include the about page, disclaimer page and Raspbian Stretch Lite project ideas.

When you want to show content in different page layouts, you can create different customized page templates to show content in different ways.

In case you need a reference, this post describes how to create a custom page template in WordPress.

Why should programmers blog?

One of the big words on the Internet nowadays is the word ‘blog’. As a noun, this word refers to a website or web page that is updated regularly by an individual or a group, written in an informal or conversational style. What you are reading now is an example of one. As a verb, it refers to the act of adding new content to a blog.

Ever since I started this blog on 14 November 2010 on a self-hosted WordPress instance, I had never stop adding content to it.

Since then, I often came across programmers asking why they should blog. To help them get started, here are some reasons for programmers to blog.

Setting up WordPress on Raspberry Pi Zero W with Raspbian Stretch Lite, Nginx, MariaDB and PHP as the LEMP stack

A Raspberry Pi Zero W is a small and capable computer that included a Wi-Fi chip for projects that requires an Internet connection.

Apart from running client programs on the Raspberry Pi Zero W, it is equally capable of being a web server. Since I had a spare Raspberry Pi Zero W lying around the house and there are good reasons to blog as a programmer, I decided to use it as a WordPress server to collect content for a new blog project.

This post documents how I setup WordPress on a Raspberry Pi Zero W with Raspbian Stretch Lite, nginx, MariaDB and PHP as the LEMP stack.

How to reflect cart count at the cart icon as and when products are added or removed from the cart in WooCommerce

Although there is a hassle free option of using WooCommerce.com as your e-commerce store, you may prefer to host your own.

If you are familiar with WordPress and wish to host your e-commerce website, WooCommerce is also available as a WordPress plugin that augments WordPress with e-commerce website features.

Although more work needs to be done for self-hosted WordPress sites, we have the option of creating our own themes without having to pay additional charges on top of the web hosting fees.

When it comes to creating our own WooCommerce themes, one feature that we may want to implement would be to show the number of products that had been added to our WooCommerce cart near the shopping cart icon as and when products are added or removed from the cart.

This post documents how we can reflect cart count at the cart icon as and when products are added or removed from the WooCommerce shopping cart.

How to get Jetpack to resync your self-hosted WordPress contents with WordPress.com

For some reason, the content on my self-hosted WordPress website did not tally with the site stats on WordPress.com. The number of drafts and published posts were wrong and the insights page does not reflect my published posts for the past two months.

Tinkering with the WordPress.com interface, I was able to find a way to get Jetpack to resync my self-hosted WordPress contents with WordPress.com. This post documents how I managed to do so.

Setting up WordPress on Raspberry Pi 3 with Raspbian Stretch Lite, Nginx, MariaDB and PHP 7 as the LEMP stack

Raspbian Stretch was released on 17th August 2017 and this will mean that we will be able to get a variant of Debian 9 on our Raspberry Pi. With Raspbian Stretch, we will be able to run WordPress or any PHP framework with PHP 7.0 which Zend had indicated a performance boost of up to two folds as compared to PHP 5.6.

Just like the benefits that blogging brings to a programmer, the performance boost that PHP 7 brings about is a good reason for me to port my blog over to PHP 7.

Before porting my blog over to PHP 7, it will make sense for me to perform a little proof of concept on my Raspberry Pi 3 first. With Raspbian Stretch Lite, I can see for myself that my blog runs well with PHP 7.0 before spawning a new Digital Ocean instance for Techcoil.

This post documents how I setup an instance of WordPress on Raspberry Pi 3 with Raspbian Stretch Lite, nginx, MariaDB and PHP 7 as the LEMP stack.

Setting up a free CA signed SSL certificate from Let’s Encrypt for my LEMP server on my Raspberry Pi 3 with an Ubuntu Server 15.10.3 image to secure my WordPress site

After setting up a LEMP web server on Raspberry Pi 3 with an Ubuntu Server 15.10.3 image to host my new WordPress website, a good colleague of mine recommended me to try implementing a free certified SSL certificate. The intelligent and generous folks from Let’s Encrypt had created a free and open Certificate Authority and an automated workflow for websites to generate certified SSL certificates for serving trusted and encrypted communication.

Since, there is no cost involved in implementing the SSL certificate, I went on to try and implement one on the Nginx server on my Raspberry Pi 3.

This post documents my process on setting up a Let’s Encrypt certified SSL certificate for my Nginx server on my Raspberry Pi 3.