Articles about Raspberry Pi Camera

Raspberry Pi Zero W and Raspberry Pi 2 3 camera with mobile phone clips

Attaching a camera to a Raspberry Pi allows us to create Raspberry Pi projects for monitoring purposes.

In addition to having a small form factor, a Raspberry Pi has a small energy footprint that won’t inflate our electrical bills.

On this page, you can find articles related to Raspberry Pi camera projects.

How to capture images in the dark with the Raspberry Pi Infrared Camera Module from Seeed Studio

When I wanted to keep tabs on my corridor, I built a Raspberry Pi Zero W surveillance camera with MotionEye and Raspbian Lite.

After a while, I make my Raspberry Pi Zero W see an ultra-wide view by using one of the Fish Eye lens from a Camera Lens kits that I received as a gift.

Since then, I am able to have a wide angle view of my corridor as long as I have a browser with an Internet connection.

However, the same setup will not work for checking on my plants in the kitchen. If I am to snap some pictures after my LED growth lights are switched off, I will definitely get pitch black images.

So what kind of camera should my plant surveillance setup use? In order to capture images in the dark, I should look for a camera without the Infrared Filter – a NoIR Camera.

With this in mind, I head over to Seeed Studio and got myself the Raspberry Pi Infrared Camera Module.

Since Seeed Studio had provided me with a voucher for this purchase, I am able to minimize the cost of producing this article.

Thank you Seeed Studio!

Given that, let’s see how we can capture images in the dark with the Raspberry Pi Infrared Camera Module.

Building a Raspberry Pi 3 prototype camera that takes a picture at the press of a button

A fun way to test your Raspberry Pi Camera on your Raspberry Pi 3 is to build a prototype that takes a picture at the press of a button. Through such an activity, we will be able to experience:

  • connecting a button to the GPIO ports on a Raspberry Pi.
  • setting up a camera through the CSI interface of a Raspberry Pi.
  • preparing an operating system, such as Raspbian Stretch Lite , for running Raspberry Pi projects.
  • coding a Python 3 script that interacts with the GPIO port and camera on a Raspberry Pi.
  • running a Python 3 script when Raspberry Pi powers on.

Given these points, this post shows how you can build a Raspberry Pi 3 prototype camera that takes a picture at the press of a button.

How to enable Raspberry Pi camera on Raspbian Stretch Lite

Previously, I had written two posts on how you can connect the Raspberry Pi Camera Module to Raspberry Pi 2/3 and Raspberry Pi Zero W:

When you install Raspbian Stretch Lite on your Raspberry Pi, you will need to enable the Raspberry Pi camera before you can use it.

In case you need a reference, this post will show you how to enable Raspberry Pi camera on Raspbian Stretch Lite.

Comparing the 0.67x wide angle lens and the Fisheye lens on a Raspberry Pi CCTV

Raspberry Pi Zero W with magnetic adapter ring 0.67x wide angle lens and fisheye lens on wooden floor

Recently, I found a pack of Camera Lens Kit for mobile phones. Inside that pack, there is one 0.67x wide angle lens and one Fisheye lens.

Given that, I had created the following posts to show how you can put them onto your Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV:

In case you want to see the effect of those lens before getting a pack to turn your Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV or Raspberry Pi 3 CCTV into wide angle security cameras, read this post to compare the effects of 0.67x wide angle lens and Fisheye on a Raspberry Pi CCTV.

How to turn your Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV into a wide angle security camera

When Raspberry Pi Zero W appeared in the market, I immediately got one and setup a Raspberry Pi Zero W security camera with motionEyeOS. In addition to taking half the size of a credit card, a Raspberry Pi Zero W comes with Wi-Fi inbuilt. Therefore, it is ideal for building a security camera that connects to your Wi-Fi network.

Previously, I wrote about how to make your Raspberry Pi Zero W camera see an ultra-wide view through a Fisheye lens.

Since the pack of Camera Lens Kits for mobile phones includes a 0.67x wide angle lens, I decided to use it to turn my other Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV into a wide angle security camera.

If you need a reference, read this to find out how you can turn your Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV into a wide angle security camera.

How to configure motionEye to only capture video if there are movements in particular sections of the surveillance area

Undeniably, Calin Crisan had created one of the best way for us to build a Raspberry Pi security camera. In addition to the ease of setup via motionEyeOS, the motionEye web-based frontend is also easy to use.

Since a Raspberry Pi security camera is used for surveillance, we will want it to record videos of things that happened when we were not looking.

However, recording footages of the surveillance area when there were no motion being detected is wasteful. Moreover, it is hard to get to the video recording of a stranger moving your flower pot when there are too many redundant video clips in your Raspberry Pi security camera.

Even if we switched on motion detection for the entire video frame, there could be motion detected outside of the area of interest. For example, we may be interested in birds resting on our plant rather than birds flying in the sky.

So how do we configure motionEye to only capture video if there are movements in a particular section of the surveillance area?

This post will show you how to do so.

How to use Python 3 Pillow on Raspbian Stretch Lite to compress your jpeg image

When you are building a Raspberry Pi camera project, you may want to compress the images captured from the camera to reduce the time to upload your image to a server endpoint. Moreover, when you connect your Raspberry Pi to your iPhone Personal WiFi hotspot, you will want to incur minimal mobile bandwidth charges from demonstrating your Raspberry Pi project in your class.

You may have either:

In this case, you will have the option to use Pillow, a fork of Python Imaging Library, to compress your jpeg image.

How to make your Raspberry Pi Zero W camera see an ultra-wide view

While I was organising cabinet, I found a pack of Camera Lens Kits for mobile phones.

Since I am using my Raspberry Pi Zero W as a surveillance camera, I figured that it would be useful if I can use the Fisheye lens in the pack to make my camera see a wider view.

This post shows how you can make a Raspberry Pi Zero W camera see an ultra-wide view.

How I setup a Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV camera with motionEye and Raspbian Stretch Lite

I had previously built a Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV camera with motionEyeOS which was connected to the Wifi network of my old DLink router.

After I started using Linksys AC1900 Dual Band Wireless Router as my home router, I could no longer connect to that Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV camera.

After reinstalling motionEyeOS a couple of times on my Raspberry Pi Zero W, I determined that motionEyeOS is not suitable for this new Wifi network.

On the other hand, my setup of WordPress on Raspberry Pi Zero W with Raspbian Stretch Lite, nginx, mariadb and PHP was able to connect to my new Wifi network, even after multiple system reboots.

Hence, I figured that if I wanted to build a Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV camera that can connect to my new Wifi network, I could use Raspbian Stretch Lite as the base operating system and install motionEye for the web frontend to view the camera footage.

This post documents how I setup a Raspberry Pi Zero W CCTV with motionEye and Raspbian Stretch Lite.