Inserting a document into a collection in MongoDB with PHP

Assume that we have a MongoDB server installed as a windows service on the same machine as our web server. The server listens on port 33333.

We met a new friend, and we want to save some details about her. That night, before bidding farewell, she said: “Remember me, I am Mary Jane. You can write to me at mary.jane@gmail.com“.

Although that’s all we have about her, this is sufficient for us to insert a document about Mary into our MongoDB database.

Inserting documents into collections in MongoDB with PHP consists of the following steps:

  • Derive an instance of the MongoCollection class that represents the MongoDB collection to insert documents.
  • Define the document to insert.
  • Define additional options for the insert.
  • Execute the insert function of the MongoCollection instance.

Connecting to and disconnecting from a MongoDB server in PHP

The first step to manipulate data in the MongoDB ecosystem is to connect to a MongoDB server. In php, we can use the Mongo class to help us connect to one or more MongoDB servers.

For the purpose of this demonstration, let’s assume that we had installed a MongoDB server instance as a windows service which listens on port 12345. In addition, our PHP web server runs on the same machine as the MongoDB instance.

Installing MongoDB as a windows service

After using MongoDB for quite a while, I realised that I had been repeating the starting up of the MongoDB database daemon whenever I reboot my PC. Manually starting the MongoDB database daemon via my command prompt whenever I want to work on my projects is inefficient.

Hence making MongoDB run as a windows service automatically when my computer starts up is one way to avoid repeating myself. In this post, I document how I install my MongoDB database as a windows service.

Make your PHP webpage loads faster by aggregating external CSS scripts

In most cases, the speed of which a browser completes the rendering a of webpage is very much dependent on the network connection which connects it to a web server. While some browsers have the luxury of fibre connections, there could be others that are rendering your webpages via a mobile network.

Because each HTTP response consists of the header portion in addition to the actual content, we could reduce the number of bytes that our browsers need to read from our servers by aggregating external CSS and JS scripts.

How to ensure that your Javascript is able to write unicode characters from external Javascript files to your HTML contents

Ever tried injecting Chinese characters into your HTML DOM from an external Javascript file but got something that resembles the following?

Gibberish characters was shown when jQuery attempts to display error message in Chinese

Well that was what I got for the Chinese version of my bilingual form initially as a result of validating an input field as the user is filling up my form.

In this post, I will discuss why I got the unwanted characters and what I did to solve the problem.

Deciding which HTTP status code to use in a HTTP response

When we are in the business of creating web applications, we are always crafting HTTP responses.

A HTTP communication session is initated with a HTTP request from the client and is ended with a HTTP response from the server. In order for a HTTP communication session to take place successfully, the server must be reachable via an IP Address and a port number.

However, a successful HTTP communication session does not imply that the client always get what it wants from the server. Within the HTTP response, the server tells the client whether or not the HTTP request is plausible to fulfill via HTTP status codes.

This is a discussion of some of the status codes that I use at the HTTP server end, in an environment where most of my HTTP clients are robotic in nature.