How to read values from a properties file located within a Java jar file

A good programming practice will be to code applications to read from a text file for values which are expected to change often. Java Swing applications are often packed in a single jar file and it can make deployment easier if our Java Swing applications can read from text files embedded within the same jar file that they reside in.

There came a time where I need to code a Java applet to read i18n labels from some properties files. This post documents my proof of concept before I embark in coding that Java applet.

How to send message from Java applet to web page via jQuery

In an attempt to save development time on reworking the RIAs from a old system, a business decision was made to reuse the Java applets on a newer system.

The newer system utilizes jQuery at the front end to fulfill modern user interactivity requirements.

This post documents a proof of concept that I did for the powerful Java applets to communicate with the front-end of the newer system.

Emulating the web production environment with an Apache HTTP server running on a Windows 7 development machine

To minimize overhead costs of my website, I would restrain myself from buying a hosted plan until my website is launch-able. In the process of developing my website, I will want my tests to be as close to the real thing as possible.

This meant that when I type in the real domain of my website in my browser location bar, my browser will connect to my development web server, instead of the web server which my domain is being parked at.

I was using Windows 7 and an instance of Apache HTTP server as my development environment when I achieved that. My Apache HTTP server was listening at port 80 for HTTP requests.

There are two main steps to achieving my objective:

  • Routing HTTP requests, made to the actual domain, to my local machine
  • Configuring Apache HTTP server to serve HTTP requests directed at the actual domain

Getting documents from MongoDB collections with PHP

We have a MongoDB server running as a windows service on the same machine as our web server. Over time, this MongoDB server had been listening on port 33333 to help us remember information that we had collected about our friends.

As time passes, our memory can hardly rival that of our MongoDB server, which was designed to help us recollect information efficiently. This post documents some proof of concept that I did for querying documents from MongoDB collection via the PHP driver.

Inserting a document into a collection in MongoDB with PHP

Assume that we have a MongoDB server installed as a windows service on the same machine as our web server. The server listens on port 33333.

We met a new friend, and we want to save some details about her. That night, before bidding farewell, she said: “Remember me, I am Mary Jane. You can write to me at mary.jane@gmail.com“.

Although that’s all we have about her, this is sufficient for us to insert a document about Mary into our MongoDB database.

Inserting documents into collections in MongoDB with PHP consists of the following steps:

  • Derive an instance of the MongoCollection class that represents the MongoDB collection to insert documents.
  • Define the document to insert.
  • Define additional options for the insert.
  • Execute the insert function of the MongoCollection instance.