Quick References

As a constant learner, I get to touch upon many ideas in different areas. This category is for me to capture those ideas which I felt people may reference to get ahead of their tasks. Most of the time, I do come back to this section of my blog to remember what I had learnt in the past.

Setting up a free CA signed SSL certificate from Let’s Encrypt for my LEMP server on my Raspberry Pi 3 with an Ubuntu Server 15.10.3 image to secure my WordPress site

After setting up a LEMP web server on Raspberry Pi 3 with an Ubuntu Server 15.10.3 image to host my new WordPress website, a good colleague of mine recommended me to try implementing a free certified SSL certificate. The intelligent and generous folks from Let’s Encrypt had created a free and open Certificate Authority and an automated workflow for websites to generate certified SSL certificates for serving trusted and encrypted communication.

Since, there is no cost involved in implementing the SSL certificate, I went on to try and implement one on the Nginx server on my Raspberry Pi 3.

This post documents my process on setting up a Let’s Encrypt certified SSL certificate for my Nginx server on my Raspberry Pi 3.

Adding swap space for my Ubuntu Server 15.10.3 image running on my Raspberry Pi 3

A swap space. also known as virtual memory, is a dedicated area on a writable medium that acts like the RAM for Linux processes to remember things while they are running. For laptop and desktop computers, that writable medium is usually a hard disk. For my Raspberry Pi 3, it is the microSD card which I had written my Ubuntu 15.10.3 image on.

While running the Let’s Encrypt application to set up a free CA signed SSL certificate for my LEMP server on my Raspberry Pi 3 to secure connections to my WordPress site, the Let’s Encrypt application hanged while it was trying to install the Python dependencies that it needed. This prompted me to turn to swap space for increasing the total memory that processes on my Ubuntu 15.10.3 image can utilize.

This post documents the steps that I took to add some swap space on my Ubuntu 15.10.3 image running on my Raspberry Pi 3 so that processes can use more than 1GB of memory.

How I resized the file system of my Ubuntu Server 15.10.3 image to utilize the entire microSD card space on my Raspberry Pi 3

After setting up a LEMP web server on Raspberry Pi 3 with an Ubuntu Server 15.10.3 image to host my new WordPress website, I decided to create some swap space to complement the 1GB ram on my Raspberry Pi 3 in running more services.

When I tried to create a 4GB swap file, the fallocate command complained that there was no space left on my Raspberry Pi 3:

Home directory of the LocalSystem account in Windows Server 2012

Quite a few applications that I had encountered throughout my career provide the option to look for custom configurations inside the home directory of user accounts that had started them. One such example is the Git command, which looks for the private key to communicate with a GitHub repository inside a .ssh directory located inside the home directory of the user that runs it.

This post documents the home directory of the LocalSystem account in my Windows Server 2012.

Supervisor configurations to ensure that my Python Flask application releases binded port(s) during a supervisor restart

We use Supervisor to help keep our Python based applications running. One of our applications was built on the Python Flask framework to provide a RESTful api to connecting clients.

With continuous integration in place, we need to restart all our Supervisor managed applications whenever there is a change being merged to the master branch in our Git repository.

This post documents the Supervisor configurations to ensure that my Python Flask application releases any port that it had binded to when Jenkins send the command to restart the Supervisor and the processes that it manages.

Setting up a LEMP web server on Raspberry Pi 3 with an Ubuntu Server 15.10.3 image to host a WordPress website

I was trying to start a new WordPress site. Before hosting it on a Digital Ocean droplet, I decided to incubate the WordPress site on a Raspberry Pi 3 to clock some content. This post documents the steps that I took to set up a LEMP web server on Raspberry Pi 3 with an Ubuntu server 15.10.3 image to host a new WordPress site.

How I make my Jenkins Slave Windows Service recognize the global modules installed by npm

I was trying to setup a Jenkins Slave on a Windows machine which will get protractor to run a series of functional tests that the team had written to test our AngularJS application.

Idea was that whenever that there was a code change being committed to the master branch on our GitHub repository, the Jenkins Slave will be called upon to checkout the latest codes and get protractor to run the functional tests base from a configuration.js file in the codebase.

One of the hurdles that I encountered was that my Jenkins Slave Windows Service was not able to recognize the executables from Node.js modules that were installed by npm globally, which in this case was the protractor executable.

This post describes the steps that I took in order to make Jenkins Slave Windows Service recognize the global modules installed by npm.

How I solved the database connection error from my WordPress installation which is hosted on the default PHP FPM server in Mac OS X EL Capitan

I was trying to setup a WordPress instance with the built-in PHP-FPM server on my Mac OS X el Capitan. After applying the relevant Nginx configurations for WordPress installations, I had been able to run the php codes from my WordPress instance.

However, when I tried to run the WordPress install script, my WordPress setup complained that it was unable to connect to the database server.

Preventing image hotlinking with Nginx, with some style

Image hotlinking is a situation when your image appears on other website(s) but that image was actually being served by your web server. Image hotlinking is bad; your image gets stolen from your website and your server resources is being spent to serve them. If you happen to be running Nginx as your web server, this post describes how you can use Nginx to prevent image hotlinking with a smarter way that was suggested by Hongkiat.