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How to setup Taiga project management platform on Raspberry Pi 3 with Raspbian Stretch Lite

Taiga and Raspbian icon

A project management platform is useful for us to keep tabs on what we want to build. Taiga is a popular open source project management platform that is highly recommended by opensource.com to be the top open source alternative to Trello.

Taiga runs well on a Raspberry Pi 3. If you want to setup something at home to help you manage the projects that you are working on, you can consider setting up the Taiga project management platform on a Raspberry Pi 3 with Raspbian Stretch Lite as the base operating system.

This post is adapted from Taiga's installation guide to serve as a guide to setting up Taiga project management platform on Raspberry Pi 3 with Raspbian Stretch Lite.

Recommended hardware list

Setting up Raspbian Stretch Lite on Raspberry Pi 3 to run Python 3 applications

As a first step setting up your Taiga project management platform on Raspberry Pi 3, follow this tutorial to setup Raspbian Stretch Lite on Raspberry Pi 3 to run Python 3 applications. After doing so, you will get your Raspberry Pi 3 running the Raspbian Stretch Lite operating system with the following software pieces:

  • SSH server which enables you to configure Raspbian Stretch Lite from another computer in your home network.
  • Python 3 for running one of Taiga's component, Taiga backend, that is based on Django.
  • Python 3 package manager (pip3) for installing the dependencies for Taiga backend.
  • Virtualenv for you to create an isolated environment for running Taiga backend.

Installing other dependency packages for Taiga

Apart from the Python packages that we had installed earlier, there are more dependency packages that we need to install for the three modules that made up the Taiga project management platform. To install those packages, run the following commands:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install -y build-essential binutils-doc autoconf flex bison libjpeg-dev
sudo apt-get install -y libfreetype6-dev zlib1g-dev libzmq3-dev libgdbm-dev libncurses5-dev
sudo apt-get install -y automake libtool libffi-dev curl git tmux gettext
sudo apt-get install -y rabbitmq-server redis-server
sudo apt-get install -y nginx supervisor
sudo apt-get install -y postgresql postgresql-contrib
sudo apt-get install -y postgresql-doc postgresql-server-dev-9.6
sudo apt-get install -y python-dev
sudo apt-get install -y libxml2-dev libxslt-dev
sudo apt-get install -y libssl-dev libffi-dev
sudo apt-get install -y libopenjp2-7-dev

Creating a system user taiga, giving it root permissions and switch the current user with taiga

Once you had installed all the dependency packages needed by Taiga project management platform, proceed on to create a system user taiga, give it root permissions and switch the current user to taiga:

sudo adduser taiga
sudo adduser taiga sudo
sudo su taiga
cd ~

You will need to use the taiga user to proceed with the rest of this guide.

Setting up PostgreSQL with the initial user and database

Once you had switched over to the taiga user, run the following commands to setup PostgreSQL for the Taiga project management platform:

sudo -u postgres createuser taiga
sudo -u postgres createdb taiga -O taiga --encoding='utf-8' --locale=en_US.utf8 --template=template0

Creating a user named taiga, and a virtual host for RabbitMQ

Once you had configured PostgreSQL for the Taiga project management platform, run the following commands to configure RabbitMQ for taiga-events:

sudo rabbitmqctl add_user taiga PASSWORD_FOR_EVENTS
sudo rabbitmqctl add_vhost taiga
sudo rabbitmqctl set_permissions -p taiga taiga ".*" ".*" ".*"

Creating the logs folder

Once you had created the RabbitMQ user and virtual host for it, create a logs directory for the various Taiga components to write logs to:

mkdir -p ~/logs

Setting up Taiga backend

After the creation of the logs directory, we can then proceed to setup Taiga backend.

Downloading a copy of Taiga backend

Run the following commands to download a copy of Taiga backend:

cd ~
git clone https://github.com/taigaio/taiga-back.git taiga-back
cd taiga-back
git checkout stable

Creating a virtual environment for Taiga backend

Run the following commands to create a virtual environment for Taiga backend:

cd ~
virtualenv -p python3 taiga-back_env

Installing Taiga backend dependencies in virtual environment

Run the following commands to install Taiga backend dependencies in the virtual environment that we had created earlier:

cd ~
source taiga-back_env/bin/activate
cd taiga-back
pip install -r requirements.txt

Populating the database with initial basic data

Run the following commands to populate the database with some initial basic data:

python manage.py migrate --noinput
python manage.py loaddata initial_user
python manage.py loaddata initial_project_templates
python manage.py compilemessages
python manage.py collectstatic --noinput

This will create the administrator account with login username admin with password 123123.

Creating the initial configuration file

Run the following command to get nano to create the initial configuration file for taiga backend:

nano ~/taiga-back/settings/local.py

And suppose that your Raspberry Pi 3 is reachable via 192.168.1.109, create the following content inside local.py:

from .common import *

MEDIA_URL = "http://192.168.1.109/media/"
STATIC_URL = "http://192.168.1.109/static/"
SITES["front"]["scheme"] = "http"
SITES["front"]["domain"] = "192.168.1.109"

SECRET_KEY = "theveryultratopsecretkey"

DEBUG = False
PUBLIC_REGISTER_ENABLED = False

DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL = "no-reply@192.168.1.109"
SERVER_EMAIL = DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL

#CELERY_ENABLED = True

EVENTS_PUSH_BACKEND = "taiga.events.backends.rabbitmq.EventsPushBackend"
EVENTS_PUSH_BACKEND_OPTIONS = {"url": "amqp://taiga:PASSWORD_FOR_EVENTS@localhost:5672/taiga"}

# Uncomment and populate with proper connection parameters
# for enable email sending. EMAIL_HOST_USER should end by @domain.tld
#EMAIL_BACKEND = "django.core.mail.backends.smtp.EmailBackend"
#EMAIL_USE_TLS = False
#EMAIL_HOST = "localhost"
#EMAIL_HOST_USER = ""
#EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = ""
#EMAIL_PORT = 25

# Uncomment and populate with proper connection parameters
# for enable github login/singin.
#GITHUB_API_CLIENT_ID = "yourgithubclientid"
#GITHUB_API_CLIENT_SECRET = "yourgithubclientsecret"

Save the configuration file when you had completed filling up your details.

Verifying Taiga backend installation

Once you had created the initial configuration file, run the following commands to run Taiga backend temporarily:

source ~/taiga-back_env/bin/activate
python ~/taiga-back/manage.py runserver

Open up another SSH session to your raspberry pi:

ssh pi@192.168.1.109

And type the following command:

curl -0 http://localhost:8000/api/v1/ 

If taiga-back is setup correctly, you should be able to see a JSON representing the list of endpoints at the url: http://localhost:8000/api/v1/.

Once you had verified that taiga-back is setup correctly, go back to the SSH session that you run Taiga backend from. Stop running Taiga backend by pressing CONTROL-C.

Setting up Taiga frontend

After setting up Taiga backend, proceed on to setup Taiga frontend.

Downloading a copy of Taiga frontend

Run the following commands to download a copy of Taiga frontend:

cd ~
git clone https://github.com/taigaio/taiga-front-dist.git taiga-front-dist
cd taiga-front-dist
git checkout stable

After the commands had completed, create the configuration file from the sample configuration:

cp ~/taiga-front-dist/dist/conf.example.json ~/taiga-front-dist/dist/conf.json

Use nano to open up conf.json:

sudo nano ~/taiga-front-dist/dist/conf.json

And supposing that your Raspberry Pi 3 is reachable via 192.168.1.109, edit conf.json to look like the following:

{
    "api": "http://192.168.1.109/api/v1/",
    "eventsUrl": "ws://192.168.1.109/events",
    "eventsMaxMissedHeartbeats": 5,
    "eventsHeartbeatIntervalTime": 60000,
    "eventsReconnectTryInterval": 10000,
    "debug": true,
    "debugInfo": false,
    "defaultLanguage": "en",
    "themes": ["taiga"],
    "defaultTheme": "taiga",
    "publicRegisterEnabled": false,
    "feedbackEnabled": true,
    "supportUrl": "https://tree.taiga.io/support",
    "privacyPolicyUrl": null,
    "termsOfServiceUrl": null,
    "maxUploadFileSize": null,
    "contribPlugins": [],
    "tribeHost": null,
    "importers": [],
    "gravatar": true
}

Setting up Taiga events

Once you had setup Taiga frontend on your Raspberry Pi 3, you may choose to setup Taiga events which is an optional component.

Taiga-events is the Taiga websocket server, it allows taiga frontend to show realtime changes in the backlog, taskboard, kanban and issues listing. Taiga events uses RabbitMQ as the message broker.

Downloading a copy of Taiga events

Run the following commands to get a copy of Taiga events:

cd ~
git clone https://github.com/taigaio/taiga-events.git taiga-events
cd taiga-events

Installing nodejs

Run the following commands to install Node.js on your Raspberry Pi 3:

curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_6.x | sudo -E bash -
sudo apt-get install -y nodejs

Installing JavaScript dependencies

Run the following commands to install the JavaScript dependencies that is required to run Taiga events:

npm install
sudo npm install -g coffee-script

Creating the configuration for Taiga events

Run the following command to base the configurations for Taiga events from the given sample:

cp config.example.json config.json

After the copy command completes, use nano to open up config.json:

nano config.json

And update the contents with your RabbitMQ URI and the secret key. Your config.json file should look like this:

{
    "url": "amqp://taiga:PASSWORD_FOR_EVENTS@localhost:5672/taiga",
    "secret": "theveryultratopsecretkey",
    "webSocketServer": {
        "port": 8888
    }
}

Note: The 'secret' in your config.json must be the same as the "SECRET_KEY" in ~/taiga-back/settings/local.py.

Configuring Supervisor to run Taiga backend and Taiga events

Supervisor is a process control system that can help keep Taiga backend and Taiga events running on your Raspberry Pi 3.

Once we had the codes for Taiga components and Taiga events in our Raspberry Pi 3, we can proceed to configure Supervisor to run them.

Configuring Supervisor to run Taiga backend

We first create a bash script for Supervisor to run Taiga backend. Inside the bash script, we will instruct gunicorn to start Taiga backend for us.

First create a file at taiga home directory:

nano ~/run_taiga_backend.sh

And inside taiga_backend.sh, create the following content:

#!/bin/bash

source taiga-back_env/bin/activate
gunicorn -w 3 -t 60 --pythonpath=./taiga-back -b 127.0.0.1:8001 taiga-back.taiga.wsgi
deactivate

Once you had saved taiga_backend.sh, run the following command to make it executable by the taiga user:

chmod u+x ~/run_taiga_backend.sh

After you had made run_taiga_backend.sh executable by the taiga user, create a supervisor configuration file at /etc/supervisor/conf.d/taiga-back.conf:

sudo nano /etc/supervisor/conf.d/taiga-back.conf

And inside taiga-back.conf create the following content:

[program:taiga-back]
directory=/home/taiga
command=/bin/bash -E -c ./run_taiga_backend.sh
autostart=true
autorestart=true
stopsignal=INT
stopasgroup=true
killasgroup=true
stdout_logfile=/home/taiga/logs/taiga-back.stdout.log
stderr_logfile=/home/taiga/logs/taiga-back.stderr.log
user=taiga

Configuring Supervisor to run Taiga events

Next up, proceed to configure Supervisor to run Taiga events. To do so, create a supervisor configuration file at /etc/supervisor/conf.d/taiga-events.conf:

sudo nano /etc/supervisor/conf.d/taiga-events.conf

And inside /etc/supervisor/conf.d/taiga-events.conf, create the following content:

[program:taiga-events]
directory=/home/taiga/taiga-events
command=/usr/bin/coffee index.coffee          
autostart=true
autorestart=true
stopsignal=INT
stopasgroup=true
killasgroup=true
stdout_logfile=/home/taiga/logs/taiga-events.stdout.log
stderr_logfile=/home/taiga/logs/taiga-events.stderr.log
user=taiga  

Restarting Supervisor

After you had created the Supervisor configurations, restart Supervisor to get it to run Taiga backend and Taiga events:

sudo systemctl restart supervisor.service

Configuring Nginx to serve Taiga frontend, Taiga backend and Taiga events

The next step is configure Nginx as a reverse proxy server for Taiga frontend, Taiga backend and Taiga events. To do so, remove /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/default:

sudo rm /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/default

And create /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/taiga.conf:

sudo nano /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/taiga.conf

Inside taiga.conf, create the following content:

server {
    listen 80 default_server;
    server_name _;

    large_client_header_buffers 4 32k;
    client_max_body_size 50M;
    charset utf-8;

    access_log /home/taiga/logs/nginx.access.log;
    error_log /home/taiga/logs/nginx.error.log;

    # Frontend
    location / {
        root /home/taiga/taiga-front-dist/dist/;
        try_files $uri $uri/ /index.html;
    }

    # Backend
    location /api {
        include proxy_params;
        proxy_set_header X-Scheme $scheme;
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8001/api;
        proxy_redirect off;
    }

    # Django admin access (/admin/)
    location /admin {
        include proxy_params;
        proxy_set_header X-Scheme $scheme;
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8001$request_uri;
        proxy_redirect off;
    }

    # Static files
    location /static {
        alias /home/taiga/taiga-back/static;
    }

    # Media files
    location /media {
        alias /home/taiga/taiga-back/media;
    }

    # Taiga-events
    location /events {
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8888/events;
        proxy_http_version 1.1;
        proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
        proxy_set_header Connection "upgrade";
        proxy_connect_timeout 7d;
        proxy_send_timeout 7d;
        proxy_read_timeout 7d;
    }
}

Save the file and restart Nginx:

sudo systemctl restart nginx.service

Accessing Taiga from your home computer

Once you had restarted Nginx, you can use the browser on your home computer to access your Taiga installation on your Raspberry Pi 3.

Suppose that your Raspberry Pi 3 is reachable from your home computer via 192.168.1.109, enter http://192.168.1.109 in the location bar.

You should see the following screen:

Taiga home page via 192.168.1.109

Changing the default password of the administrator account

Remember that we had created an administrator account with login username admin with password 123123. This is not safe as anybody who read this post can get administrator access to your Taiga installation.

To change the password of the administrator account, click on the "login" button at the top right corner to get to the login page. Enter the default administrator account credentials in the login page:

Taiga login page with admin credentials supplied

And click on the "LOGIN" button.

Once you had logged into Taiga successfully, click on the "Administrator" button at the top, and then the "EDIT BIO" button at the right. You will see the "USER SETTINGS" page:

Taiga user settings screen

Click on the "CHANGE PASSWORD" button on the left to access the "CHANGE PASSWORD" page:

Taiga change password screen

Enter the relevant input and click on the "SAVE" button.

Changing profile photo

Notice that the profile photo is broken. To correct that, go to the "USER SETTINGS" page by clicking on the "USER PROFILE" tab at the left. In the "USER SETTINGS" page, click on the "CHANGE PHOTO" button to choose a picture from your computer as the new profile picture.

Configuring your Taiga installation to be accessed from outside your home network via HTTPS with Let's Encrypt certificate

At this point in time, you had setup a Taiga installation on your Raspberry Pi 3 that can only be accessed from within your home network.

If you want to be able to access your Taiga installation from outside your home network, there are more configurations to be done.

Pre-requisites

As mentioned in an earlier post on how to host multiple websites from home, you will need the following pieces for enabling your Taiga installation to be accessed from outside your home network via HTTPS with Let's Encrypt browser-trusted certificate:

Installing CertBot

Once you had met the pre-requisites, proceed to install Certbot on Raspbian Stretch Lite.

Configuring Nginx to facilitate Certbot in acquiring the SSL certificate for your domain or subdomain

Suppose that you had designated taiga.yourdomain.com as the domain to reach your Taiga installation on your Raspberry Pi 3.

With that, let's first move /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/taiga.conf to /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/taiga.yourdomain.com.conf:

sudo mv /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/taiga.conf /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/taiga.yourdomain.com.conf

Next, open up /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/taiga.yourdomain.com.conf with nano:

sudo nano /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/taiga.yourdomain.com.conf

And change the contents of taiga.yourdomain.com.conf to look like the following:

server {
    listen 80;
    server_name taiga.yourdomain.com;

    large_client_header_buffers 4 32k;
    client_max_body_size 50M;
    charset utf-8;

    access_log /home/taiga/logs/nginx.access.log;
    error_log /home/taiga/logs/nginx.error.log;

    # For ACME challenge
    location ~ /.well-known {
        root /home/taiga;
        allow all;
    }

    # Frontend
    location / {
        root /home/taiga/taiga-front-dist/dist/;
        try_files $uri $uri/ /index.html;
    }

    # Backend
    location /api {
        include proxy_params;
        proxy_set_header X-Scheme $scheme;
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8001/api;
        proxy_redirect off;
    }

    # Django admin access (/admin/)
    location /admin {
        include proxy_params;
        proxy_set_header X-Scheme $scheme;
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8001$request_uri;
        proxy_redirect off;
    }

    # Static files
    location /static {
        alias /home/taiga/taiga-back/static;
    }

    # Media files
    location /media {
        alias /home/taiga/taiga-back/media;
    }

    # Taiga-events
    location /events {
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8888/events;
        proxy_http_version 1.1;
        proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
        proxy_set_header Connection "upgrade";
        proxy_connect_timeout 7d;
        proxy_send_timeout 7d;
        proxy_read_timeout 7d;
    }

}

These configuration changes will make Nginx server proxies HTTP requests bound for http://taiga.yourdomain.com to the respective Taiga components.

In addition, these configuration changes allow Let's Encrypt servers to access a secret file that Certbot will create inside /home/taiga/.well-known directory in the process of requesting for Let's Encrypt browser-trusted certificate.

After you have saved the Nginx configuration changes, restart Nginx:

sudo systemctl restart nginx.service

Running Certbot to get the SSL certificate artefacts for your domain / subdomain

Once Nginx had restarted successfully, run the following command to get the Let's Encrypt artefacts for your domain / subdomain:

sudo certbot certonly -a webroot --webroot-path=/home/taiga -d taiga.yourdomain.com

Generating a Diffie-Hellman group

Once Certbot had fetched the SSL certificate artefacts for your domain / subdomain, proceed on to generate a Diffie-Hellman group for Nginx to use for exchanging cryptographic keys with its clients:

sudo openssl dhparam -out /etc/ssl/certs/dhparam.pem 2048

Configuring Nginx to serve HTTPS traffic

With the Diffie-Hellman group generated, we can then proceed on to configure Nginx to serve HTTPS traffic for requests made to our Taiga installation.

To do so, open up /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/taiga.yourdomain.com.conf with nano:

sudo nano /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/taiga.yourdomain.com.conf

And change the contents of taiga.yourdomain.com.conf to look like the following:

server {
    listen 80;
    server_name  taiga.yourdomain.com;
    return 301 https://$host$request_uri;
}
  
# For ssl
server {
    ssl on;
    ssl_certificate /etc/letsencrypt/live/taiga.yourdomain.com/fullchain.pem;
    ssl_certificate_key /etc/letsencrypt/live/taiga.yourdomain.com/privkey.pem;
    ssl_protocols TLSv1 TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2;
    ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;
    ssl_dhparam /etc/ssl/certs/dhparam.pem;
    ssl_ciphers 'ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:DHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:DHE-DSS-AES128-GCM-SHA256:kEDH+AESGCM:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA256:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:DHE-DSS-AES128-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256:DHE-DSS-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:AES128-GCM-SHA256:AES256-GCM-SHA384:AES128-SHA256:AES256-SHA256:AES128-SHA:AES256-SHA:AES:CAMELLIA:DES-CBC3-SHA:!aNULL:!eNULL:!EXPORT:!DES:!RC4:!MD5:!PSK:!aECDH:!EDH-DSS-DES-CBC3-SHA:!EDH-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:!KRB5-DES-CBC3-SHA';
    ssl_session_timeout 1d;
    ssl_session_cache shared:SSL:50m;
    ssl_stapling on;
    ssl_stapling_verify on;
    add_header Strict-Transport-Security max-age=15768000;
      
    default_type  application/octet-stream;
      
    listen 443;
    server_name  taiga.yourdomain.com;
  
    access_log /home/taiga/logs/nginx.access.log;
    error_log /home/taiga/logs/nginx.error.log;

    # For ACME challenge
    location ~ /.well-known {
        root /home/taiga;
        allow all;
    }

    # Frontend
    location / {
        root /home/taiga/taiga-front-dist/dist/;
        try_files $uri $uri/ /index.html;
    }

    # Backend
    location /api {
        include proxy_params;
        proxy_set_header X-Scheme $scheme;
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8001/api;
        proxy_redirect off;
    }

    # Django admin access (/admin/)
    location /admin {
        include proxy_params;
        proxy_set_header X-Scheme $scheme;
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8001$request_uri;
        proxy_redirect off;
    }

    # Static files
    location /static {
        alias /home/taiga/taiga-back/static;
    }

    # Media files
    location /media {
        alias /home/taiga/taiga-back/media;
    }

    # Taiga-events
    location /events {
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8888/events;
        proxy_http_version 1.1;
        proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
        proxy_set_header Connection "upgrade";
        proxy_connect_timeout 7d;
        proxy_send_timeout 7d;
        proxy_read_timeout 7d;
    }

}

Save the configuration changes and restart Nginx:

sudo systemctl restart nginx.service

Updating Taiga backend and Taiga frontend configurations to take the new url settings

The last step is to update Taiga backend and Taiga frontend configurations.

Open up ~/taiga-back/settings/local.py:

nano ~/taiga-back/settings/local.py

And change the contents to look like the following:

from .common import *

MEDIA_URL = "https://taiga.yourdomain.com/media/"
STATIC_URL = "https://taiga.yourdomain.com/static/"
SITES["front"]["scheme"] = "https"
SITES["front"]["domain"] = "taiga.yourdomain.com"
 
SECRET_KEY = "theveryultratopsecretkey"
 
DEBUG = False
PUBLIC_REGISTER_ENABLED = False
 
DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL = "no-reply@example.com"
SERVER_EMAIL = DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL
 
#CELERY_ENABLED = True
 
EVENTS_PUSH_BACKEND = "taiga.events.backends.rabbitmq.EventsPushBackend"
EVENTS_PUSH_BACKEND_OPTIONS = {"url": "amqp://taiga:PASSWORD_FOR_EVENTS@localhost:5672/taiga"}
 
# Uncomment and populate with proper connection parameters
# for enable email sending. EMAIL_HOST_USER should end by @domain.tld
#EMAIL_BACKEND = "django.core.mail.backends.smtp.EmailBackend"
#EMAIL_USE_TLS = False
#EMAIL_HOST = "localhost"
#EMAIL_HOST_USER = ""
#EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = ""
#EMAIL_PORT = 25
 
# Uncomment and populate with proper connection parameters
# for enable github login/singin.
#GITHUB_API_CLIENT_ID = "yourgithubclientid"
#GITHUB_API_CLIENT_SECRET = "yourgithubclientsecret"

Open up ~/taiga-front-dist/dist/conf.json:

nano ~/taiga-front-dist/dist/conf.json

And change the contents to look like the following:

{
    "api": "https://taiga.yourdomain.com/api/v1/",
    "eventsUrl": "wss://taiga.yourdomain.com/events",
    "eventsMaxMissedHeartbeats": 5,
    "eventsHeartbeatIntervalTime": 60000,
    "eventsReconnectTryInterval": 10000,
    "debug": true,
    "debugInfo": false,
    "defaultLanguage": "en",
    "themes": ["taiga"],
    "defaultTheme": "taiga",
    "publicRegisterEnabled": false,
    "feedbackEnabled": true,
    "supportUrl": "https://tree.taiga.io/support",
    "privacyPolicyUrl": null,
    "termsOfServiceUrl": null,
    "maxUploadFileSize": null,
    "contribPlugins": [],
    "tribeHost": null,
    "importers": [],
    "gravatar": true
}

Once you had saved the configuration files, restart Supervisor:

sudo systemctl restart supervisor.service

With that when you use your browser to access taiga.yourdomain.com, your browser will be redirected to https://taiga.yourdomain.com which allows your browser to communicate with your Taiga installation via HTTPS.

Setting up Taiga to send email

At this point in time, our Taiga installation will not be able to send email.

Installing Postfix for Taiga to send email

To allow email to be sent by Taiga, first install Postfix as the SMTP server for programs to send email from Raspbian Stretch Lite.

Changing the Taiga backend configurations to allow the sending of email

Once you had installed Postfix on your Raspbian Stretch Lite, open up ~/taiga-back/settings/local.py:

nano ~/taiga-back/settings/local.py

And change the contents to look like the following:

from .common import *

MEDIA_URL = "https://taiga.yourdomain.com/media/"
STATIC_URL = "https://taiga.yourdomain.com/static/"
SITES["front"]["scheme"] = "https"
SITES["front"]["domain"] = "taiga.yourdomain.com"
 
SECRET_KEY = "theveryultratopsecretkey"
 
DEBUG = False
PUBLIC_REGISTER_ENABLED = False
 
DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL = "no-reply@taiga.yourdomain.com"
SERVER_EMAIL = DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL
 
#CELERY_ENABLED = True
 
EVENTS_PUSH_BACKEND = "taiga.events.backends.rabbitmq.EventsPushBackend"
EVENTS_PUSH_BACKEND_OPTIONS = {"url": "amqp://taiga:PASSWORD_FOR_EVENTS@localhost:5672/taiga"}
 
# Uncomment and populate with proper connection parameters
# for enable email sending. EMAIL_HOST_USER should end by @domain.tld
EMAIL_BACKEND = "django.core.mail.backends.smtp.EmailBackend"
EMAIL_USE_TLS = False
EMAIL_HOST = "localhost"
EMAIL_HOST_USER = ""
EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = ""
EMAIL_PORT = 25
 
# Uncomment and populate with proper connection parameters
# for enable github login/singin.
#GITHUB_API_CLIENT_ID = "yourgithubclientid"

Once you had saved the changes, restart Supervisor:

sudo systemctl restart supervisor.service

Buying the Raspberry Pi 3 hardware to host your own Taiga project management platform

If you do not have the Raspberry Pi 3 hardware mentioned in this post yet, you may want to purchase them from Amazon. Simply click on the button below to add the Raspberry Pi 3 hardware to your cart. You may remove anything that you already have or replace some of the hardware with other hardware.


How to setup Taiga project management platform on Raspberry Pi 3 with Raspbian Stretch Lite

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About Clivant

Clivant a.k.a Chai Heng enjoys composing software and building systems to serve people. He owns techcoil.com and hopes that whatever he had written and built so far had benefited people. All views expressed belongs to him and are not representative of the company that he works/worked for.

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